Programs Founded by JLN

The Junior League Home for Crippled Children (now Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt), 1923

Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital is one of the most respected pediatric facilities in the country and is dedicated to meeting the unique health-care needs of children, from newborn to young adult, and their families. The vision for the hospital was first realized in 1932, with the establishment of the Junior League of Nashville’s Home for Crippled Children. Today, JLN is active in many programs and maintains a close relationship with Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital.

Nashville Children’s Theatre, 1931

Nashville Children’s Theater was founded by the Junior League of Nashville in 1931 and is the oldest children’s theater in the country. The Comfort Room in the newly remodeled facility is named after the Junior League of Nashville.

Dede Wallace Center (now Centerstone), 1956

The Junior League of Nashville founded the Mental Health Guidance Center in 1956, which was later renamed the DeDe Wallace Center in 1971 in honor of Junior League volunteer, Louise “Dede” Bullard Wallace. Now known as Centerstone, it is the nation’s  largest community mental health organization.

Volunteer Action Center/The Volunteer Center, 1969

Curiosity Center – Cumberland Science Museum (now Adventure Science Center), 1981

The Junior League of Nashville developed this new project and donated $10,000 to the Cumberland Science Museum, now Adventure Science Center, to open the Curiosity Center as a learning room.

Museum Experience Room – Tennessee State Museum, 1981

The League donated $7,000 to the Tennessee State Musuem and proudly opened to the public the Museum Experience Room.

Artist in Residence Program of the Nashville Institute for the Arts, 1982

Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA), 1983

Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA), 1983 CASA came to Nashville in 1983, founded jointly by the local chapters of the National Council of Jewish Women and the Junior League of Nashville. These organizations provided the initial funding, and their members formed the first steering committee. CASA’s mission is to expedite the process through which these abused and neglected children are found permanent, safe homes.

Junior League Children’s Lung Center at Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital, 1984

In 1985, the Junior League presented Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital with a check for $509,000 to provide a Junior League Children’s Lung Center, the first center of its type in Tennessee, and the fourth center in the region to provide pulmonary care and treatment for children ages one through fourteen.

Amanda the Panda, 1986

Recovery Residences of Nashville, Inc., 1987

Metro General Child Abuse Project/Our Kids, 1987

As a founding partner of OUR KIDS, the Junior League of Nashville understood the value of having a core group of expert providers perform child sexual abuse evaluations and in 1987 helped to begin the work of OUR KIDS. The following year a small group of committed Junior League volunteers formed a community board and developed a non-profit corporation to support the project.

Heart of the Matter, 1987

For Santa’s Sake, 1987

Kare for Kids Homeless Daycare Center, 1990

Junior League Center for Chronic Illnesses and Disabilities of Children, 1992

The Junior League of Nashville gave $750,000 to Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital to fund the Junior League Center for Chronic Illness and Disabilities of Children program, which also houses the Family Resource Center.

Junior League Women’s Center at Meharry Hubbard Hospital, 1992

National Immunization Coalition/Don’t Wait to Vaccinate, 1992

Teen Outreach, 1992

The Junior League Respite Care Center at Vanderbilt’s Children Hospital, 1994

The Junior League Respite Care program was established to provide weekend care for chronically ill children, allowing parents a much-needed break.

Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation/Nashville Chapter, 1996

In 1997 the Susan G. Komen Greater Nashville Chapter was founded through the leadership of  the Junior League of Nashville members and other community leaders. The Susan G. Komen of Greater Nashville’s first president, Shana Alford, went on to become the Junior League of Nashville president from 2006-2007.

Renewal House, 1996

The Junior League of Nashville provided a $50,000 founding grant to Renewal House, Nashville’s first, largest and most comprehensive recovery community for mothers with addictions and their children.  Renewal House has a long-term residential program focused on recovery while also providing life skills training, vocational assistance and parenting education. At Renewal House, mothers and children heal from the effects of addiction together.

The Junior League Child Care Center at Red Shield Family Initiative, 2000